When is trampled snow more beautiful than a pristine quilt of the fresh-fallen stuff? When it reminds you of your blessings.

At Heart"wings", Anita Klumpers explains why blemished snow can be beautiful

Even if you don’t live in an area of the world coated by snow right now, you’ve no doubt seen photos of the white stuff. I’m not talking those everything-is-buried, please-come-rescue-us pictures flashed on the news. I mean the ones of countrysides sparkling under new fallen snow. Or quaint villages covered with a thick fluffy blanket of white.

Does snow need to be untouched to be lovely? Anita Klumpers at Heart"wings" doesn't think so.

THE SURPRISE OF TRAMPLED SNOW
Replace the quaint village with a street bounded by tidy ranch houses and you’d have an accurate picture of our old neighborhood. As far as my eye could see, snow lay thick and undisturbed on yards and bushes. Except right out my own picture window. Every square inch of our front yard had been trampled by three little pairs of snow boots.

Our neighborhood was heavy on retirees and families with teens, light on children. It was easy to spot the home with three small boys. They put fingerprints and nose prints on the picture window, scuffs on the walls and dents in the floorboards. Nowhere was the presence of active children more obvious than the first morning after a snowfall.

I’m a snow lover. The kind who dreams of living in a Currier and Ives world and rejoices in big fat flakes falling from the sky. Wouldn’t you have thought I’d resent that mess of prints and sled skids and snowball scars?  I surprised myself by loving every imperfection.

THE BLESSING OF TRAMPLED SNOW
It must have been what those footprints represented. Like the fingerprints and dents and scuffs, they were continual reminders that I had been blessed beyond my imaginings. A handful of noisy, busy, boisterous boys hadn’t been in my game plan. But God gave them to me and I discovered that I not only loved them, I loved every indication of them.

These days we are in a different house in a different neighborhood. My boys are grown and I still have fingerprints on the windows and scuffs on the walls and blotchy snow from little grandsons. I love it all.

THE SIGNIFICANCE OF TRAMPLED SNOW
You know this Scripture verse, right? “Come now, and let us reason together, saith the Lord: though your sins be as scarlet, they shall be as white as snow;…” (Isaiah 1:18a KJV) 
I used to picture immaculate, untouched slopes and fields with sparkling new snowfall when reading that verse. But now I feel more like the woman who anointed Jesus’ feet with tears and fragrant oil. “Wherefore I say unto thee, Her sins, which are many, are forgiven; for she loved much: but to whom little is forgiven, the same loveth little.” (Luke 7:47 KJV)

When I look at my life, God reminds me that my sins are washed clean. Behind me stretches a lifetime of white snow. Nowhere can Satan find anything to accuse me of. But I don’t see the clean sweep of good works and my own perfection. I see an expanse of trampled snow and skid marks and scars that are cleansed by the priceless and perfect blood of Christ.

And I am reminded of how much I am loved and blessed. Every footprint encourages me to love much and to thank much, because I have been forgiven much.

Is trampled snow beautiful? Anita Klumpers asks at Heart"wings "The Beauty of Trampled Snow"

I need daily reminders that my sins are forgiven and that I am free to love. How about you? Can you thank God with confidence that your sins are cleansed white as snow?

 

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Anita Klumpers

Anita Klumpers is a wife, mom and grandma. Her life is remarkable by its very ordinariness. She’s been blessed with a husband who is good and hardworking, a church that is small but gospel-driven, children who for every step back took two forward. Convinced that a bit of humor and a dose of prudishness could be her contributions toward a better world she started to blog, first at ‘The Prude Disapproves’ (http://theprudedisapproves.blogspot.com) and now as‘The Tuesday Prude.’ (http://thetuesdayprude.com) She goes for coffee with friends frequently, writes skits and teaches drama classes seasonally, cleans the top of her fridge occasionally and marvels at God’s grace daily. Anita has two romantic-suspense novels published through Prism Book Group: ’Winter Watch’ and ‘Hounded.’ Currently at work on a third novel, she would accomplish more if she spent less time admiring her small but oh-so-briliant grandsons.

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